4 - Planning

Think Ahead


In the previous session, Jeff explained the ins and outs of the contemplation stage. In this session, he will talk about the planning stage and what constitutes a strong or weak goal. 



To move toward change, we need to set goals and make plans to achieve that goal Jeff listed three types of goals—pseudo goals—that can throw people off track:
  • Dead Man’s Goal, or a goal that a dead man can do better than you.
  • Emotional Goal, or a goal to control an emotion.
  • Infinite Goal, or a goal someone can only achieve with unlimited resources.

Which of the three pseudo goals do you witness most often? How have you seen these types of goals prevent growth?
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Have you ever fallen into one of these off-track goals? If so, how did that goal impact your progress? If not, how do you formulate your goals in order to avoid these traps?
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Jeff said, “We can’t have feelings drive the bus. Virtues have to drive the bus.” How did his statement strike you? Why?
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In what ways do the goals you set keep your limited resources in mind?
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This week, how could you guide those you lead away from pseudo goals?
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 Setting purposeful, attainable goals can provide a clear path toward action. As you guide those you lead toward change, point them away from dead man’s goals, emotional goals, and infinite goals. The more you can help them avoid pseudo goals, the more likely they will achieve lasting change.

 
Some Plans are Better Than Others


In the previous section, we learned what kinds of goals to avoid. Now, Jeff will explain what constitutes a good, achievable goal. Listen to what he has to say about SMART goals. 



Jeff said leaders should guide others toward SMART goals:
  • Specific: measurable and objective.
  • Meaningful: connect to values.
  • Adaptive: adapt to the multiple behaviors and habits that contribute to the goal.
  • Realistic: to who we are.
  • Time: needs a time frame.

Which element of SMART stood out to you the most? Why?
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Of the five attributes of a SMART goal, which ones come easily to you? Which ones aren’t as natural? Why?
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A specific goal is measurable, behavioral, and objective. Think of a nonspecific goal you or someone you know set in the past. How did the unspecific goal prove to be unhelpful?
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Meaningful goals connect to values. What values appeal to you the most? Why?
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What values to you hold in your organization? How could you use those values to make a goal meaningful for you employees?
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A good goal is adaptive—it can be reached through a variety of behaviors. In what ways have you made goals adaptable?
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Goals should also be realistic to who we are and the resources we have. When making a goal what realistic expectations can you set for yourself? For your employees?
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Goals have to have time frames in order for them to have meaning. What time frames have you used before in goal setting? How did they help you meet your goal? Where did you see room to adapt?
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Jeff said the planning stage only lasts for a short period of time. Leaders should take advantage to help employees toward their goals. What could you do this week to help someone you lead make a plan of action toward a SMART goal?
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As you set out to help your employees make a plans to achieve goals, think of some goals you can make for yourself. Come up with leadership goals that you can work on as you lead others. Use Jeff’s SMART model and avoid pseudo goals—and teach the people you lead to do the same.