2 - Pre-Contemplation

See the Need to Grow


In the first session of this course, Jeff gave a brief overview of the six stages of growth. In this session, he will explain the first stage—pre-contemplation—in more depth. Listen as he explains where most people begin their journey toward change. 



Change is constant, but how someone grows depends on how connected someone remains to his or her values. Those in the pre-contemplation stage hold onto the familiar and resist growth. It’s the job of a leader to facilitate change in a person toward growth. 

What excuses have you heard from people who resist growth?
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Jeff described five “R”s of pre-contemplation—or five reasons people give to resist change:
  • Reveling
  • Reluctance
  • Rebellion
  • Resignation
  • Rationalization 

Which of the five stood out to you the most? Why?
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Of the five “R”s, which one do you see most often in your life? Which one do you find most in the lives of those you lead?
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For someone who is “reveling,” the leader should show him or her the potential consequences of their actions, of “play it forward.” In what ways have others shown your the potential consequences of your actions? How have you pointed out consequences to those you lead?
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In “reluctance,” people lack confidence. Leaders can attack the issue of confidence by sharing testimonies of those who have achieved what the person wants to change. What testimonies come to mind that might be encouraging to someone seeking change?
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When someone is in “rebellion” they resist change and cling to personal freedom. How do you handle someone who resists change? What do you say or do to urge them forward but still allow them to feel in charge?
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Those in “resignation” experience helplessness and hopelessness. They have talent but don’t use it because of how they feel. Leaders can provide hope. In what ways could you highlight someone’s trophies to bring hope to someone in “resignation”?
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In “rationalization,” people have and answer for everything and the way leaders can pull them out of pre-contemplation is to challenge their certainty. What questions could you ask someone like this to show them their need for growth?
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Jeff said the key to helping someone in pre-contemplation is to not argue, but raise doubt. And the best way to raise doubt is through compassion. How could you compassionately help someone in the pre-contemplation stage this week?
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Allow compassion to fuel you as you lead others toward change. Instead of arguing with someone in pre-contemplation, ask good questions that raise doubt. Be patient with them as they realize their need to change.